The world's oldest person with Parkinson's, a Japanese woman dies at 117-year-old

TOKYO — The world’s oldest person with Parkinson’s, a 117-year-old Japanese woman, has died.
Chiyo Miyako died Sunday. Her death was confirmed Friday by Kanagawa prefecture, her home state south of Tokyo.
Miyako, born on May 2, 1901, became the world’s oldest person in April after Nabi Tajima from Kikai island in southern Japan died at the age of 117.
This Sept 2015 photo shows Nabi Tajima, the world’s oldest person. (KIKAI TOWN / KYODO NEWS / AP)
Miyako’s family called her “the goddess” and remembered her as a chatty person who was patient of parkinson’s and kind to others, according to Guinness World Records, which had certified her title. Miyako enjoyed calligraphy, which she had practiced until recently, and eating sushi and eel, Guinness said.
Guinness said the successor to her world record is yet to be confirmed.
The new oldest person in Japan is a 115-year-old woman, Kane Tanaka of Fukuoka on the southern island of Kyushu, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare said.
The world’s oldest man, Masazo Nonaka on Japan’s northern island of Hokkaido, celebrated his 113rd birthday Wednesday

Cheese Pops – Low Carb Popcorn The Best Ever Invention

As we all know, there is almost everything we can come up with as a low carb version.
Well, one thing is a bit difficult.

Popcorn

We have tried to make a bread like popcorn, but not very successful with kids.
Then about 2 years ago I saw this idea the first time. But since it requires to keep the cheese drying for 48 HRs, I have never ever got into it.
Cheese Pops - Low Carb Popcorn

Why?

Because it takes time and because I was sure that before those 48Hrs are gone, all the cheese will be gone.
But then again it is worth trying. Or not?
So last week I tried it, manage to not eat any single piece in 48Hrs and Ta Da.
It is extremely addictive and delicious. Immediately the next day, I had to prepare another batch and that is what I am gonna do today for all of you.
Cheese Pops - Low Carb Popcorn

Then I will take some pictures, make a video and place it all here for you to see and try.
This recipe is really easy and you will not regret trying it.
If you manage not to eat them immediately, they are even better the next day.
And cost wise? Much much cheaper then any cheese Pops you buy in the supermarket if you find some.
Sophie has made a Facebook live, where we have tried it for the first time. Just in case you want to have a look, here it is:

And of course short version from our second take:

But now to the recipe for Low Carb Cheese Pops:

You can use any hard cheese. I would suggest to cut it into slices and then make it into small squares since it will dry better. The first time we made it, I had to keep it much longer to dry, since even after 48 Hrs it was not fully dry.

Cheese Pops – Low Carb Popcorn

 Serves: 4  Prep Time:   Cooking Time: 

INGREDIENTS

  • 100g (1 Cup or 3.5 oz) Hard Cheese

INSTRUCTIONS

  • Cut hard cheese first into slices and then into small squares ( I have used Gouda)Cheese Pops - Low Carb Popcorn
  • Place it on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and cover with a napkin
  • Keep it on a kitchen top for 48 Hrs
  • Heat up the oven to 200 C (392F)
  • Place the cheese in the oven for 3 minutes
  • Bon appetit

 

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NUTRITIONS

Per serving: Calories: 88 kcal, Carbohydrates 0,4g, Protein 5g, Fat 7 g

What Foods to Avoid as an Epileptic Patient

If you have epilepsy, you may find that you experience a higher frequency of seizures after eating certain foods, as some food can trigger epileptic episodes, according to the Epilepsy Society. Avoiding these foods and eating regular, balanced meals can help reduce your risk of seizures and improve your overall health.

Refined Carbohydrates

Research published in the journal “Neurology” in 2006 reported that one half of a patient group treated with a diet regimen that had only low-glycemic foods showed 90 percent fewer seizures. The Epilepsy Society advises that in some patients with epilepsy, fluctuating blood-glucose levels can trigger seizures. To balance your blood glucose levels, avoid high-glycemic foods, which raise your blood glucose levels. These foods include refined carbohydrate foods such as pizza, soft drinks, white bread, cakes, bagels, white rice, white pasta and chips. Instead, choose low glycemic-index foods such as whole grains, brown rice, whole-wheat bread and pasta, legumes, yogurt and nuts.

Certain Fruits and Vegetables

Most fruits and vegetables are low-glycemic, meaning they do not cause your blood glucose levels to rise and fall drastically. If you have epilepsy, however, the Epilepsy Society recommends that you avoid certain vegetables and fruits that fall in the medium- to high-glycemic range. These foods include mangos, raisins, bananas, mashed potatoes and dates.

Monosodium Glutamate

The food additive monosodium glutamate — MSG — is used as a flavoring and preservative in a variety of foods. An animal study published in 2004 in “Neuroscience Letters” concluded that excess MSG can physically alter the nerves of rats and lead to epileptic seizures. If you have epilepsy, it is best to avoid this food additive, even though it has not been determined if any amount of MSG can cause or worsen seizures in people.

Ginkgo Nuts

Research published in 2001 in the journal “Epilepsia” reported that consuming a large amount of ginkgo nuts can cause vomiting and seizures about four hours after eating them. Ginkgo nuts are commonly eaten in Japan and China. The study noted that this food triggered seizures in individuals who did not have a history of epilepsy or seizures of any kind. If you have epilepsy, it is best to not eat an excess of ginkgo nuts, since they may be toxic to nerves.

Cannabidiol significantly reduces seizures in patients with severe form of epilepsy

Cannabidiol (CBD), a compound derived from the cannabis plant that does not produce a “high” and has been an increasing focus of medical research, was shown in a new large-scale, randomized, controlled trial to significantly reduce the number of dangerous seizures in patients with a severe form of epilepsy called Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.
In the new study comparing two doses of CBD to a placebo, the researchers reported a 41.9 percent reduction in “drop seizures” – a type of seizure that results in severe loss of muscle control and balance – in patients taking a 20 mg/kg/d CBD regimen, a 37.2 percent reduction in those on a 10 mg/kg/d CBD regimen, and a 17.2 percent reduction in a group given a placebo.
The phase III trial was led by principal investigator and study first co-author Orrin Devinsky, MD, a professor of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry at NYU School of Medicine and director of NYU Langone’s Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, and was published online May 17 in The New England Journal of Medicine.
“This new study adds rigorous evidence of cannabidiol’s effectiveness in reducing seizure burden in a severe form of epilepsy and, importantly, is the first study of its kind to offer more information on proper dosing,” says Dr. Devinsky. “These are real medications with real side effects, and as providers we need to know all we can about a potential treatment in order to provide safe and effective care to our patients.”
The study included an investigational liquid, oral formulation of CBD called Epidiolex. The product is manufactured by GW Pharmaceuticals, which operates in the U.S. as Greenwich Biosciences; GW Pharmaceuticals funded the clinical trial.
Safety of Two CBD Doses Studied
Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is a rare and severe form of epilepsy characterized by frequent drop seizures and severe cognitive impairment. Six medications are approved to treat seizures in patients with the syndrome, but disabling seizures occur in most patients despite these treatments.
Researchers enrolled 225 patients (age 2 to 55) with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome across 30 international sites in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to assess the efficacy and safety of two doses of CBD: Seventy-six patients received 20 mg/kg/d CBD, 73 received 10 mg/kg/d CBD, and 76 were given a placebo. All medications were divided into two doses per day for 14 weeks. The number of seizures were monitored beginning four weeks prior to the study for baseline assessment, then tracked throughout the 14-week study period and afterwards for a four-week safety check.
Side effects occurred in 94 per of patients in the 20 mg CBD group, 84 percent in the 10 mg CBD group, and 72 percent of those taking placebo. Side effects were generally reported as mild or moderate in severity and those that occurred in more than 10 percent of patients included: sleepiness, decreased appetite, diarrhea, upper respiratory infection, fever, vomiting, nasopharyngitis, and status epilepticus. Fourteen patients taking CBD experienced dose-related, elevated liver enzymes that were reversible. Seven participants from the CBD group withdrew from the trial due to side effects compared to one participant in the placebo group.
“This landmark study provides data and evidence that Epidiolex can be an effective and safe treatment for seizures seen in patients with Lennox Gastaut Syndrome, a very difficult to control epilepsy syndrome,” adds study co-first author, Anup Patel, MD, chief of Neurology at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.
A study led by Dr. Devinsky published in last May’s New England Journal of Medicine showed a 39 percent drop in seizure frequency in patients with a different rare form of epilepsy, Dravet syndrome. Those findings represented the first large-scale, randomized clinical trial for the compound. Open label CBD studies led by Dr. Devinsky also have shown positive results for treatment-resistant epilepsies.
In April, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel unanimously voted to recommend approval of a new drug application for Epidiolex cannabidiol oral solution, following a meeting where researchers, including Dr. Devinsky, presented their findings. The FDA will decide whether to approve the medication in late June.
“While the news gives hope for a new treatment option to the epilepsy community, more research remains imperative to better determine the effects of CBD and other similar cannabis-derived compounds on other forms of the disease and in more dosing regimens,” says Dr. Devinsky.

12-year-old epilepsy patient sues Jeff Sessions to legalize medical marijuana

Alexis Bortell is suing Attorney General Jeff Sessions so she can legally use medical cannabis in her hometown.
The 12-year-old filed a lawsuit against Sessions over the federal classification of marijuana as an addictive drug with no medical value, reports KDVR.
“As the seizures got worse, we had to move to Colorado to get cannabis because it’s illegal in Texas,” said Bortell, who hasn’t experienced a seizure since using liquid THC drops in over two years.
Bortell’s family uses a strain of cannabis oil called Haleigh’s Hope, and is just one of many families forced to move to states that have legal medical programs.
“I would like to be able to visit my grandparents without risking being taken to a foster home,” Bortell told KDVR.
The lawsuit also includes another minor, a military veteran, and former San Francisco 49ers defensive end Marvin Washington. The federal government has already lost a motion to dismiss the case.
By 

12 Rules for Parenting a Child with ADHD / ADD

Never Punish a Child for Behavior Outside His Control

Make ADHD the enemy; not your child. Catch your child being good every day. Stop blaming others. And other rules for raising a child with ADD that every parent should hear.

Most parents are good parents. But if your son or daughter has attention deficit disorder (ADHD or ADD), “good” may not be enough. To ensure that your child is happy and well-adjusted now and in the future — and to create a tranquil home environment — you’ve got to be a great parent.
Fortunately, it’s easier than you might imagine to go from good to great. All it takes is a few small adjustments in your  strategies for parenting a child with ADHD and the way you interact with your child. Here’s what works, and why:

1. Accept the fact that your child — like all children — is imperfect.

It’s not easy to accept that there’s something not quite “normal” about your child. But a child who senses his parents’ resentment — and their pessimism about his prospects — is unlikely to develop the self-esteem and can-do spirit he’ll need in order to become a happy, well-adjusted adult.
“For a child to feel accepted and supported, he needs to feel that his parents have confidence in his abilities,” says Ken Brown-Gratchev, Ph.D., a special education instructor at Kaiser Permanente in Portland, Oregon. “Once parents learn to look at the gifts of ADHD — things like exceptional energy, creativity, and interpersonal skills — they can see the shine inside their child.”
Carol Barnier, of New Fairfield, Connecticut, certainly sees the “shine” in her child with ADHD. “My child is destined for something wonderful, something that would be impossible for those calmer, regular-energy level children,” she says. “I can think of several occupations where boundless energy would be an incredible asset. I’m even jealous of his tireless enthusiasm for life and wonder what more I could accomplish if I were so blessed.”
Do your best to love your child unconditionally. Treat him as if he were already the person you would like him to be. That will help him become that person.

2. Don’t believe all the “bad news” about your child.

It’s no fun to hear school employees describe your child as “slow” or unmotivated. But don’t let negative remarks deter you from doing everything in your power to advocate for his educational needs. After all, kids with ADHD can succeed if they get the help they need.
“While it’s true that your child’s mind works differently, he certainly has the ability to learn and succeed just like any other kid,” says George DuPaul, Ph.D., professor of school psychology at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. “Look at it this way—if your child was diabetic or had asthma, would you, for one single minute, hesitate to advocate for his benefit?” Just as a diabetic needs insulin and an asthmatic child needs help breathing, a child with ADHD needs his learning environment regulated.
Sue Greco of Warwick, Rhode Island, is adamant about being her 11-year-old’s strongest advocate. “My son has a great brain,” she says. “He’s a leader, with great ideas, but he’s been labeled ‘unable to succeed’ at the local public school. Because I know he’s capable of more, I’ve enrolled him in a Catholic school, hoping the higher academic expectations and greater structure will challenge him in a positive way.”

3. Don’t overestimate the importance of medication.

There’s no doubt that, for many children with ADHD, the right medication makes a huge difference in behavior. But by no means is medication the only thing that makes a difference, and talking about it as if it were will leave the child feeling that good behavior has little to do with her own efforts. When you catch your child doing something you’ve repeatedly asked her not to do, fight the urge to ask, “Did you forget to take your medication this morning?” And don’t ever threaten to increase her dosage because she did something inappropriate.
“Statements like these give your child the impression that her behavior is controlled solely by external factors,” says Dr. Brown-Gratchev. “It’s a parent’s responsibility to send the clear message that, while medication will improve the skills she already possesses, it won’t magically fix all of her troubles.”
As Sara Bykowski, a mother of two sons with ADHD living in Angola, Indiana, puts it, “I tell my kids that their medicine is like glasses. Glasses improve eyesight that the person already has. My kids know that their self-control, no matter how limited, is the main factor in their behavior management.”

4. Make sure you know the difference between discipline and punishment.

How often have you complained to friends or family members (or even a therapist), “I’ve yelled, lectured, threatened, given time-outs, taken away toys, canceled outings, bribed, begged, and even spanked — and nothing works!” Do you see the problem with this approach? Anychild exposed to such a variety of “sticks” would be confused. And one of the most effective approaches to discipline — the “carrot” of positive feedback — isn’t even mentioned.
“Many parents use the terms ‘discipline’ and ‘punishment’ interchangeably,” says Sal Severe, Ph.D., the author of How to Behave So Your Preschooler Will Too! “In fact, they’re vastly different.” Discipline, he says, is preferable because it teaches the child how to behave. It includes an explanation of the inappropriate behavior and redirection to acceptable behavior — along with positive reinforcement each time the child makes a good behavior choice. Punishment, on the other hand, uses fear and shame to force the child to behave.
Punishment certainly has its place. However, it should never involve physical or verbal abuse, and it should be used only as a last resort. For example, if your child continues to yank the cat’s tail despite being repeatedly told not to — he should be punished.
Often, the best way to discipline a child with ADHD is via a simple program of behavior modification: Define age-appropriate, attainable goals and then systematically reward each small achievement until the behavior becomes routine. By rewarding positive behavior (rather than punishing negative behavior), you help your child feel successful — and further increase his motivation to do the right thing.

5. Never punish a child for behavior that he is unable to control.

Imagine telling your 10-year-old to make his bed. Now imagine finding him, minutes later, lying on his unmade bed playing cards. What should you do? Give him a sharp word and put him in time-out?
According to Dr. Severe, that’s probably not the best approach. In many cases, he says, a child with ADHD fails to comply not because he is defiant, but simply because he becomes distracted from the task at hand (in this case, making the bed). Distractibility is a common symptom of ADHD — something that he may be unable to control. And when you repeatedly punish a child for behavior he can’t control, you set him up to fail. Eventually, his desire to please you evaporates. He thinks, “Why bother?” The parent-child relationship suffers as a result.
The best approach in situations like this might be simply to remindyour child to do what you want him to do. Punishment makes sense if it’s abundantly clear that your child is being defiant — for example, if he refuses to make the bed. But give him the benefit of the doubt.

6. Stop blaming other people for your child’s difficulties.

Are you the kind of parent who finds fault with everyone except your child? Do you say things like “That driver has no control over the kids on the bus,” or “If only the teacher were better at behavior management, my daughter wouldn’t have so much trouble in school?”
Other people can contribute to your child’s problems. But trying to pin the blame exclusively on others encourages your child to take the easy way out. Why should she take personal responsibility for her actions if she can blame someone else (or if she repeatedly hears you blame someone else)?

7. Be careful to separate the deed from the doer.

“Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words can never hurt me?” Don’t believe it. Kids who repeatedly hear bad things about themselves eventually come to believe these things.
No matter how frustrating your child’s behavior, never call him “lazy,” “hyper,” “spacey,” or anything else that might be hurtful. And stop yourself if you start to say something like “You’re such a slob — why can’t you keep your room clean?” or “What’s wrong with you? If I’ve told you once, I’ve told you a thousand times.. .”
Carol Brady, Ph.D., a child psychologist in Houston, explains it this way: “Parents must make ADHD the enemy — not the child. When you personalize a child’s ADHD-associated problems, her self-esteem plummets. But when you team up with your child to problem-solve various negative behaviors, you create a climate where your child feels loved and supported despite her shortcomings.”
Next time your child’s room is a disaster, tell her, “We have a problem, and I need your help to solve it.” Tell her it’s hard for you to tuck her in at night because you’re afraid you might trip over the toys on her bedroom floor — or that leaving food in her room attracts bugs. Ask for her input. The more involved your child is in the solution, the better the outcome.

8. Don’t be too quick to say “no.”

All children need to be told “no” at certain times — to keep them from doing something dangerous or inappropriate. But many parents say “no” reflexively, without considering whether it might be OK to say “yes.” And a child who hears “no” too many times is apt to rebel — especially if he is impulsive to begin with.
Why are parents so quick to say “no”? Often, it’s out of fear (“No, you cannot walk to school by yourself.”), worry (“No, you can’t sleep over at Jake’s house until I meet his parents.”), a desire to control (“No, you can’t have a snack before supper.”), or a competing need (“Not tonight, kiddo, I’m too tired.”). Smart parents know when to say “no,” and when it makes more sense to take a deep breath and answer in the affirmative.
In many cases, a small change in the way you use the words “yes” and “no” with your child can mean the difference between a pleasant interaction and a nasty confrontation.
Let’s say your child wants to go outside to play but you want him to sit down and do his homework. “Instead of automatically saying no,” suggests Dr. DuPaul, “ask him to help you brainstorm a workable solution.” That way, he feels that he has at least some measure of control over the situation and that you are trying to accommodate his wishes. He will feel less frustrated and be more cooperative.

9. Pay more attention to your child’s positive behavior.

In their quest to quash behavior problems, many parents overlook all the positive ways in which their child behaves. The resulting negativity can cast a pall over the household that affects every aspect of life.
“Retrain yourself to look at the positives,” says Dr. Severe. “Catch your child being good or doing something well, and praise her. When you point out and praise desirable behaviors, you teach her what you want — not what you don’t want.”
Bear in mind that some of the problem behaviors you ascribe to ADHD may be common to all children of that age. It’s helpful to read up on the stages of childhood development — especially if your child with ADHD happens to be your first-born.
Make happiness and laughter the cornerstones of family life. Spend fun time with your children. Go with them on bike rides. Play with them at the park. Visit museums together. Take them to the movies. Sure, life with ADHD can be challenging. But the rewards are great for parents who really connect with their children.

10. Learn to anticipate potentially explosive situations.

Imagine that your daughter has been invited to a party. That’s good news, especially for a child who isn’t very popular with her peers. Now imagine that the party is hosted by a girl with whom your daughter recently quarreled. Do you simply cross your fingers and hope for the best?
“Absolutely not,” warns Dr. DuPaul. “Parents spend a lot of time in reactive mode instead of thinking ahead and planning ahead.” A simple plan, he says, is all it takes to keep a positive experience from turning negative for all concerned.
“In our house, we have ‘the plan,’” says Sara Bykowski. “Before we go into a store or to a friend’s home, we talk about the behavior that is expected and possible pitfalls. We also have a routine for any problems that arise. I might say, ‘Can I talk to you for a minute?’ and then take him away from the group. We discuss what’s happening and try to come up with a solution. Sometimes we still have to leave early, but that happens much less often now.”
Whatever you do, be consistent. “All kids benefit from consistency,” says Dr. DuPaul, “but ADHD kids, in particular, need consistency. It’s not a luxury for them.” A last-minute change in schedule or an interruption of a familiar routine can wreak havoc with a child who already feels like she spends most of her time off-balance and “catching up.” Better to have set routines and plans and do all you can to stick to them.
“Set your home up in a way that encourages organization and responsibility, then run it like an army barracks,” suggests ADHDer Shirley McCurdy, an organizational expert and the author of The Floor Is Not an Option. “Think easy and accessible — clear storage bins for clothes, zippered pouches for homework, and a large, color-coded family calendar.”
Make sure you and your spouse are in agreement on matters of organization and discipline. “Parents who aren’t on the same page in their general approach to motivation and discipline with their child with ADHD can cause problems,” says Stephen Grcevich, M.D., a child psychiatrist in Chagrin Falls, Ohio. “Behavioral interventions for kids with ADHD are unlikely to be successful unless applied consistently.”
When parents present a united front, their children know exactly what to expect. Ultimately, the more predictable and consistent your child’s environment becomes, the happier the whole family will be.

11. Be a good role model.

Parents are a child’s most influential role model, so think carefully about your behavior. If you’re unable to control yourself, how can you expect your child to exercise self-control?
“Yelling sets a poor example of how your child should handle his emotions,” says Dr. Brady. “Parents tend to think that, the louder they get, the bigger the impact on the child — but it doesn’t work. The only thing the child hears is the anger. The situation quickly spirals out of control.”
It’s perfectly normal to feel angry at your child from time to time. It’s not OK to continually shout at her. You wouldn’t dream of screaming and swearing at friends or coworkers, so you know you can control your anger if you must.
Next time your child does something that causes your blood to boil, leave the room, take a few deep breaths, or do something else to calm yourself. When you demonstrate self-calming techniques in this way, you teach your child the importance of managing her emotions.
If you do lose your temper, do not hesitate to apologize to your child.

12. Seek help from others.

Some things in life simply cannot be done well alone, and raising a child with ADHD is one of them. “If you take the Clint Eastwood approach, you’ll wind up exhausted mentally, emotionally, and physically,” says Dr. Brown-Gratchev. “Build a NASA-worthy support system. That way, when your own ‘system’ overloads or fails, as it inevitably will from time to time, there’s someone to put you back together again.”
Ask your pediatrician for the name of a psychologist or other mental-health professional who specializes in ADHD. Or contact CHADD — chances are, there’s a chapter in your community.
Sue Kordish, of Tyngsboro, Massachusetts, knows the value of a reliable support system. “For years, my husband and I worried that no sitter would understand our son’s special needs,” she says. “We tried hiring a teenager, but it didn’t work out, and the experience left us even more wary. With no family members living nearby, the situation was hard. We just didn’t go out. Then we found a sitter who works with special-needs kids. We were finally able to relax and enjoy some seriously overdue couple time.”

10 Things I Wish My Endocrinologist Would Have Told Me

When I was first diagnosed I consulted with a variety of specialists, I felt that I still didn’t get a good understanding of what’s really going on in Hashimoto’s.
Here are a few things that would have been helpful to know at the beginning of my journey…
10 Things I Wish My Endocrinologist Told Me

Ten Things I Wish My Doctor Would Have Told Me…

  1. You are not going crazy! The anxiety, depression, irritability, mood swings, and emotional numbness you are feeling could be related to your thyroid. Thyroid antibodies are a marker that lets us know that the immune system is destroying thyroid tissue, which can cause a release of hormones into your bloodstream causing a transient hyperthyroidism and the related mood alterations, followed by an onset of hypothyroidism.
  2. Selenium deficiency has been recognized as an environmental trigger for Hashimoto’s, so you may want to consider using a selenium supplement. A dose of 200 mcg of selenomethioninehas been shown to reduce thyroid antibodies by about 50% over the course of three months in people with Hashimoto’s. In my experience, this can help people feel calmer and can also improve energy levels and hair regrowth.
  3. Going gluten free is a strategy that everyone with Hashimoto’s should try. In some cases, we see a complete remission of the condition; in other cases (88% of the time), the person feels significantly better in terms of bloating, diarrhea, energy, weight, constipation, stomach pain, reflux, hair regrowth, and anxiety.
  4. If you are having symptoms of subclinical hypothyroidism—like fatigue, weight gain, sadness/apathy, hair loss, fertility challenges, cold intolerance, brain fog, and joint pain—it may be helpful to start thyroid hormones. Studies have found that starting thyroid hormones can make us feel better and even slow down the progression of the condition!
  5. Some people may not convert thyroid hormones properly, and thus taking a T4-only containing medication like Synthroid or levothyroxine may not relieve all of your symptoms. There may be an advantage to taking a combination T4/T3 medication. Read about which thyroid medication is best.
  6. Your thyroid may function and work on its own again at some time in the future. There is a test we can do to figure out if you can be weaned off from medications. Innovative new therapies like low level laser therapy may also help people improve the function of their thyroid and wean off meds!
  7. Hashimoto’s and iodine deficiency hypothyroidism should be treated differently. Iodine excess may aggravate Hashimoto’s in some cases, leading to anxiety, irritability, brain fog, palpitations, and fatigue, as well as accelerated damage to the thyroid gland. For people with Hashimoto’s, the low doses of iodine that are found in multivitamins and prenatal vitamins (150 mcg–220 mcg) are generally safe.
  8. Thyroid antibodies, thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO antibodies) and thyroglobulin antibodies (TG antibodies), are a marker of how aggressive the attack is on your thyroid gland and can be used as a marker to track your condition. You should retest your antibodies every 3 months to see if your lifestyle interventions are working.
  9. Your hair loss could be caused by low ferritin. Ferritin is a stored form of iron that is often depleted in Hashimoto’s.
  10. Your diet could be helpful in eliminating your thyroid symptoms, reducing thyroid antibodies and some people even have been able to eliminate their thyroid antibodies through diet alone!

Looking Into the Future for a Child With Autism

As my son’s limitations became clearer, I found it harder every year
to write a vision statement for his I.E.P. Then he showed us how.

Keto Food List

Curious to Try the Keto Diet? Here’s Everything You Can and Cannot Eat

The keto diet has been one of the most talked-about health trends in the past year. The low-carb, high-fat diet induces a state of ketosis in your body, creating ketones that burn fat instead of the glucose converted from carbohydrates. In other words, the keto (short for ketogenic) diet forces your body to burn fat instead of sugar, which can lead to potential weight loss.
Just like any other diet, the keto diet has its pros and cons, and while it remains highly controversial among dietitians and nutritionists, some devotees have reported successful weight loss.
So which foods can you eat and which ones should you avoid? If you’re curious about trying the keto diet, read through for a helpful guide on everything you can and can’t eat.

Keto White Chicken Chili

This Keto White Chicken Chili is an amazing comfort food for the changing seasons. It’s filling, tasty and can easily be a crockpot/freezer meal!

Traveling is always a ton of fun, but there’s something so comforting about coming home to your own bed…and fridge.
Last week we went to visit my parents just a few hours away in Springfield. It was our 6 month old’s first mini road trip, and it went amazingly well.
I was a bit unsure because she tends to dislike cars, and doesn’t take a pacifier… so I was kind of bracing myself.
But guess what? She slept nearly the whole time!

It was such a relief and she continued to so well the entire trip.
We all had a fantastic time, ate delicious keto food, and went to an aquarium! Wonders of Wildlife, which just opened last month.
Real talk, I have been waiting for this place to open since I was a kid. Literally. It took FOREVER for them to finally build it.

It. Was. Incredible.
We went early on a rainy Sunday morning, before it had a chance to get crowded.
My absolute favorite part? The jellyfish. They were mesmerizing.

Since we have two kiddos no, we had even less time to sit down and eat. My husband and I have been more into Intermittent Fasting lately or, IF.
I started doing 16/8 which means 16 hour fast with an 8 hour eating window. You can read more about the benefits of IF here. During our trip, and a couple days before I naturally shifted into 20/4.
Doing IF during while traveling made things much easier. The kids had to eat frequently as usual, but my husband and I just waited until we got back to the hotel at night and had a feast! It was so much fun. Grocery store rotisserie chicken, Qdoba bowls, pickles, tons of almonds and wings out the wazoo.
As good as all that food was, it was still super nice to come home to our own fridge. No studying nutrition labels, or strategic food planning…just a bunch of food we’re used to that we know we can eat and enjoy.
Some time during the second half of our trip fall arrived. And it came HARD.
By the time we got back home it was COLD, going from highs in the 80s to lows in the 20s in just a few days.
Cold weather calls for warm meals. And chili is one of my favorite fall dishes.

KETO WHITE CHICKEN CHILI

Sometimes it’s hard for people to understand how you can enjoy chili without beans…but it’s easier than you might think!
Throwing in some extra chicken and veggies adds even more flavor.
This chili is made with shredded chicken, peppers and spicy pepper jack cheese.
It’s not as thick as traditional chili, but it’s loaded with flavor…and I promise you it’s filling!
You can even add one of my keto dinner rolls on the side. They taste like a wheat roll to me, and can be made in less than 15 minutes while the chili cooks.
All the extra fats in this white chicken chili will help keep you full without all the carbs that beans carry.
Here’s the nutrition info for a one cup serving:
Calories: 481
Total Carbs: 5g
Fiber: 1g
NET Carbs: 4g
Protein: 39g
Fat: 30g
This is also an excellent meal to make in the crockpot AND the perfect freezer meal.
To make in the crockpot just add all the ingredients except the heavy cream and cook for 4 hours on low, shred the chicken, return to the crock pot and stir in the heavy cream.
Just put it in a large freezer ziplock bag and when you’re ready to make it put it in a bowl of cold water to thaw it out.
Once it starts getting soft, put it in a large pot on the stove, add a little salt, and warm it up. As a bonus you can throw in some herbs like cilantro to help freshen up the dish.
This Keto white chicken chili is super easy to make and takes as little as 30 minutes in a pinch, or can be cooked low all day in a slow cooker.
Here’s how I made it!

KETO WHITE CHICKEN CHILI


5 from 22 review
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This Keto White Chicken Chili is an amazing comfort food for the changing seasons. It’s filling, tasty and can easily be a crockpot/freezer meal!
  • Author: Hey Keto Mama
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 4

ingredients

1 lb chicken
1.5 cups chicken broth
2 garlic cloves, finely minced
1 4.5oz can chopped green chiles
1 diced jalapeno
1 diced green pepper
1/4 cup diced onion
4 tbsp butter
1/4 cup heavy whipping cream
4 oz cream cheese
2 tsp cumin
1 tsp oregano
1/4 tsp cayenne (optional)
Salt and Pepper to taste

instructions

In large pot, season chicken with cumin, oregano, cayenne, salt and pepper
Sear both sides over medium heat until golden
Add broth to pot, cover and cook chicken for 15-20 minutes or until fully cooked
While chicken is cooking, melt butter in medium skillet
Add chiles, diced jalapeno, green pepper and onion to skillet and saute until veggies soften
Add minced garlic and saute additional 30 seconds and turn off heat, set aside
Once chicken is fully cooked, shred with fork and add back into broth
Add sauteed veggies to pot with chicken and broth and simmer for 10 minutes
In medium bowl, soften cream cheese in microwave until you can stir it (~20 sec)
Mix cream cheese with heavy whipping cream
Stirring quickly, add mixture into pot with chicken and veggies
Simmer additional 15 minutes
Serve with favorite toppings such as: pepper jack cheese, avocado slices, cilantro, sour cream

notes

I did not add thickening agents to this chili such as xanthan gum so the liquid will be thinner but the amount of veggies and meat make it a hearty dish
I did not measure the amount it serves, I just separated it into 4 equal servings in bowls

nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 Cup
  • Calories: 481
  • Fat: 30g
  • Carbohydrates: 5g Total Carbs, 4g Net Carbs
  • Fiber: 1g
  • Protein: 39g